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Noticeboard

FAMILY & FRIENDS TEST (FFT)

Please tell us what you think of the service you received when visiting the Practice - See the on-line Family and Friends Test button on the home page of this website. 
NEW DOCTORS

A warm welcome to Dr K Sangha (ST2) who has joined the Practice for 6 months with effect from 7.2.2018 and to Dr T Doll (FY2) who has joined on placement for 4 months with effect from 4.4.2018

WASTED APPOINTMENTS

Patients who repeatedly fail to attend appointments they have made are being sent warning letters. Patients who continue to waste appointments after a warning may be removed from the patient list.

 

TELEPHONE ACCESS

We are continuing with our drive to improve telephone access.  To reduce the demand on the telephone patients can use the "Online" Services detailed on this website.

 

"OUT OF HOURS" 

When the surgery is closed there will be a recorded message giving clear instructions on how to contact the “Out of Hours” Service or, if the surgery is closed for training during normal hours, how to contact a doctor.  For “Out of Hours” Service - Telephone 111

If the Surgery is closed for training -

Telephone 01922 501999


Home Visits

Home visits should only be requested when you are too ill to attend the surgery. Please attend the surgery for a consultation whenever possible. Should a visit be necessary please ring the surgery before 11.30am as this helps the doctors to plan their rounds, only urgent requests should be made after this time

Cancelling your Appointment
If you are unable to attend your appointment at St. Peter's Surgery, please give 24 hours notice by telephone or by using the link at the bottom of this page to cancel your appointment.

 

Cervical Screening (Smear Tests)

Cervical screening is a method of preventing cervical cancer by detecting abnormal cells in the cervix (lower part of the womb). Cervical screening is not a test for cancer, but it is a test to check the health of the cervix.

Most women's test results show that everything is normal. But for one in 20 women, the test will show some changes in the cells of the cervix. Most of these changes will not lead to cervical cancer and the cells will go back to normal on their own. In some cases, the abnormal cells need to be treated to prevent them becoming a problem later.  

NHS Choices - Cervical Screening
The why, when & how guide to cervical screening

Cervical Screening
This factsheet is for women who would like information about having a cervical smear test for screening. This means having the test when you don't have any symptoms.


HPV Vaccination

Since September 2008 there has been a national programme to vaccinate girls aged 12-13 against human papilloma virus (HPV).

There is also a three-year catch up campaign that will offer the HPV vaccine (also known as the cervical cancer jab) to 13-18 year old girls.

The programme is delivered largely through secondary schools, and consists of three injections that are given over a six-month period. In the UK, more than 1.4 million doses have been given since the vaccination programme started.

What is Human papilloma virus (HPV)?
Human papilloma virus (HPV) is the name of a family of viruses that affect the skin and the moist membranes that line your body, such as those in your cervix, anus, mouth and throat. These membranes are called the mucosa.

There are more than 100 different types of HPV viruses, with about 40 types affecting the genital area. These are classed as high risk and low risk.

 

How you get HPV?
Types of HPV that affect the skin can be passed on by skin contact with an affected person. The types of HPV that affect the mouth and throat can be passed on through kissing. Genital HPV is usually spread through intimate, skin to skin, contact during sex. You can have the genital HPV virus for years and not have any sign of it.  

How HPV can cause cervical cancer?
Most HPV infections are harmless or cause genital warts, however some types can cause cervical cancer. Most HPV infections clear up by themselves, but in some people the infection can last a long time. HPV infects the cells of the surface of the cervix where it can stay for many years without you knowing.

The HPV virus can damage these cells leading to changes in their appearance. Over time, these changes can develop into cervical cancer. The purpose of cervical screening (testing) is to detect these changes, which, if picked up early enough, can be treated to prevent cancer happening. If they are left untreated, cancer can develop and may lead to serious illness and death.  


Resources

Cancer Research UK
HPV Facts and information

NHS Choices - HPV Vaccination
Why, how and when is the vaccination given and what are the side effects

HPV Vaccine
This factsheet is for people who would like information about the human papilloma virus (HPV) vaccine.


These links all come from trusted resources but if you are unsure about these or any other medical matters please contact your doctor or pharmacist for advice
 
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